Massive Lawsuit Brought Against Consumer Financial Protection Bureau by PayPal

  • PayPal says that the regulations implemented by the CFPB force them to make “misleading and confusing” disclosures to customers.
  • The payment processing firm is asking to be compensated for the attorney fees and cost of taking this case to court.

PayPal is one of the biggest payment processors in the world, and they’ve served millions of customers on various merchant websites. However, they have recently gotten involved in a lawsuit against the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. According to PayPal, the CFPB has required them to make disclosures about its fees with “misleading and confusing” statements.

The lawsuit, which was filed on December 11th by PayPal, states that the agency seems to be unclear on the substantial ways that digital wallets and prepaid products (like their prepaid debit cards) differ. A court filing revealed to CoinTelegraph shows that the CFPB requires both digital wallets and prepaid products to be regulated under the same rules. However, this type of regulation for the digital wallets that PayPal offers is “fundamentally ill-suited,” as PayPal states.

Within this lawsuit, there’s a specific CFPB rule in question – “Prepaid Accounts Under the Electronic Fund Transfer Act (Regulation E) and the Truth in Lending Act (Regulation Z) Rule.” The rule was originally implemented in April this year, and it states that PayPal must provide users with a disclosure on the fees that are not charged by the company. PayPal claims that the rule also doesn’t properly demonstrate what most customers actually pay for their fees.

Essentially, the rule states that the descriptions of these fees on PayPal that “undermine PayPal’s own clear disclosures” need to be simplified. Furthermore, the rule bans them from offering information to consumers that would otherwise allow them to make “an informed decision,” and instructed the firm to tell their customers the worst possible fee that they may come up against, “even if the fee would rarely be incurred.”

In the filling, PayPal added, “The Rule mandates that customers be given — and actually view — ‘short form’ fee disclosures. The requirements for this short form disclosure are extremely prescriptive and rigid. Certain fee categories must be placed in specified positions and presented in certain font sizes […] The Rule further prohibits PayPal from including explanatory phrases within the disclosure box to describe the nature of these fee categories.”

Along with the petition for the ruling by CFPB to be deemed unconstitutional, the push to relieve them of it also asks that PayPal be awarded the costs and attorney fees by the court, as they deem appropriate.

Andrew Rossow, an internet attorney from Ohio, said that the lawsuit from PayPal makes it clear that there are many regulators – CFPB included – don’t actually understand the new technologies being launched in the industry today, like blockchain, artificial intelligence, and others.

Rossow added, “I think the CFPB’s recent expansion of Regulation E (Prepaid Accounts Under the Electronic Fund Transfer Act) and Regulation Z (Truth in Lending Act) was premature because it still doesn’t understand, in my opinion, how these digital wallets (which includes cryptocurrency wallets—hot and cold) operate and the parties that involved in even the most ‘basic’ of digital money transactions.”

If the court sides with PayPal, the progress could be huge for the cryptocurrency industry. After all, PayPal isn’t just standing up for itself – it is “defending the business operation of each of its competitors, protecting themselves from unwarranted and almost endless liability at any given point in time,” says Rossow.

PayPal has recently revealed their substantial quarterly profits and has been recording new users and more transactions. However, the platform recently cut some of their partnerships, including their ties to Pornhub and their models.

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Author: Krystle M

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